Gloucester Harbor Heritage

The Former Gloucester MGP Remediation Project is taking place within historic Gloucester Harbor, home to one of New England’s first fishing fleets and a centerpiece of Gloucester’s maritime heritage.

John Mason’s 1831 Map of Gloucester, Cape Ann shows the harbor’s sheltered location and village (map reproduction courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library).  Click on the map for a larger view.

John Mason’s 1831 Map of Gloucester, Cape Ann shows the harbor’s sheltered location and village (map reproduction courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library). Click on the map for a larger view.

2014 aerial view of Gloucester

2014 aerial view of Gloucester Harbor (USDA FSA National Agricultural Imagery Program 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Europeans first settled the Gloucester and Cape Ann region in 1623 when the Plymouth Company established a seasonal fishing post to take advantage of the plentiful stocks of cod, haddock, mackerel, and other fish in coastal waters. By the time Gloucester was incorporated as a town in 1642, other fishing settlements had established themselves around Cape Ann, and Gloucester’s economy included shipbuilding and agriculture.

In the early 18th century, Gloucester’s shipbuilders were making sloops, ships, and brigantines and revolutionized the trade when they launched the world’s first schooner in 1713. Fishing, shipbuilding, and coastal shipping between colonial American ports soon transformed colonial Gloucester from a hinterland to a prospering seaport, with Harbor Village at Gloucester Harbor as its largest settlement.

The American Revolution and the economic depression that followed affected the maritilme trades but, by the early nineteenth century, the economy exceeded pre-war levels. Gloucester’s ships brought fish and New England farm products such as beef to the West Indies and returned with sugar, molasses, rum, coffee, and cocoa. In Europe, Gloucester’s fish were exchanged for salt, fruit, wine, and hard currency. Trading profits were reinvested in Gloucester’s fishing and shipbuilding industries, and fine residences and commercial buildings were built in Harbor Village.

In the mid-19th century, fishing surpassed the value of merchant trading and, according to a later historian, Gloucester was “the greatest fishing town in America”. Income from fishing grew from $500,000 to $3,000,000 from 1837 to 1865. This growth was supported by the improved access to markets provided by railroads and the expansion of American cities that raised consumer demand. Gloucester incorporated as a city in 1873, and its fishing industry peaked about 1895, with more than 5,500 fishermen. By this time, a total of 22 shipbuilding companies produced vessels worth more than $175,000 annually. Other industries such as granite quarrying and summer tourism emerged and grew in importance in the late nineteenth century and created new settlement clusters around the city.

Captain John Ribiera on the "Old Glory" out of Gloucester in 1942

Captain John Ribiera on the “Old Glory” out of Gloucester in 1942

The crew on the "Old Glory" out of Gloucester in 1942 (photos courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration–Office of War Information photograph collection LOT 1770 (F)).

The crew on the “Old Glory” out of Gloucester in 1942 (photos courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration–Office of War Information photograph collection LOT 1770 (F)).

In the 20th century, Gloucester’s granite industry declined, but its fishing and fish packing industries persevered despite depleted fish stocks and competition from fishing fleets in other Massachusetts ports. As tourism and service industries have expanded in importance, Gloucester’s maritime heritage persists as an essential component of the city’s identity.

The Former Gloucester MGP Remediation Project remediation activities are taking place under a permit issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and are therefore subject to review under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. This act requires that federal agencies consider the effects their undertakings have on historic properties. The Corps and National Grid have consulted with the Massachusetts Historical Commission, the Gloucester Historical Commission, and other preservation groups to identify and preserve Gloucester Harbor’s significant historic and archaeological resources in and next to the Remediation Project areas. These resources consist of the waterfront industries and infrastructure of the Gloucester Harbor Historic District and Gloucester Harbor Area, including Burnham’s Marine Railway, and archaeological sites relating to these properties.